Aesthetic Barometers Imply Atmospheric Pressures

 

Mitra Tabrizian, Tehran 2006, 2006, C-type light jet print, 40 x 119 in / 101 x 302 cm, Edition of 5, 2 APs (image courtesy of gallery website)

Mitra Tabrizian, Tehran 2006, 2006, C-type light jet print, 40 x 119 in / 101 x 302 cm, Edition of 5, 2 APs (image courtesy of gallery website)

Mitra Tabrizian: Photographs

June 7-July 7

Leila Heller Gallery

568 West 25th Street

New York, New York

For her first exhibition in New York City, Mitra Tabrizian will showcase eight photographs taken in Iran and England. These fabricated scenes appear regular but unfold into scenes of awkward tension and isolation. The scenes “characterize her subjects,” who are mostly business people and oppressed women, that wallow in dissociation. The figures rarely interact and appear lost. Her newest series, Leicestershire 2012, flips the theme and focuses on the desolate character of decrepit buildings in the city of the series’s name. Although these photos are a downer as summer dances into New York with its hands in the air, it wasn’t so long ago that many of us could relate to her introverted, even directionless, images.

Mitra Tabrizian, Leicestershire 2012, 2012, C-type photographic print, 61 x 48", Edition of 5, 2 APs (image courtesy of gallery website)

Mitra Tabrizian, Leicestershire 2012, 2012, C-type photographic print, 61 x 48", Edition of 5, 2 APs (image courtesy of gallery website)

 

 

Brian Kenny, Caught Red Handed, 2012, ink and acrylic on vintage American shooting target paper, 22.5 X 34" (image courtesy of the gallery's website)

Brian Kenny, Caught Red Handed, 2012, ink and acrylic on vintage American shooting target paper, 22.5 X 34" (image courtesy of the gallery's website)

Brian Kenny: The Hole Truth

June 20-July 22

Envoy Enterprises

131 Chrystie Street

New York, New York

Somehow individual rights like equal pay across gender lines, the ability to marry a partner you love or walk down the street without being harassed by authority figures are still withheld from a humungous population of American citizens. These issues, fueled by paranoia, are continually debated. Brian Kenny adds to the dialogue, “reflecting on what it means to be a disaffected gay American.” His work revolves around fallen and mutated symbols, including police officers, targets, American flags, and sign language. This is his first exploration of fabric but the exhibition also includes several of his free-associative drawings.

Brian Kenny, Deconstructed Flag #1 (Fallen Stars), 2012, Cotton, Sateen and thread,  72 X 42" (image courtesy of the artist's website)

Brian Kenny, Deconstructed Flag #1 (Fallen Stars), 2012, Cotton, Sateen and thread, 72 X 42" (image courtesy of the artist's website)

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About Lynn Maliszewski, Contributor-at-Large

Lynn Maliszewski is a freelance writer based in Brooklyn, New York. She curated and composed work for ArtWrit, BOMB Magazine, HAHA Magazine, Hyperallergic, LatinLover, Modern Painters, No.3, Whitehot Magazine, and Whitewall. She is currently the Contributor-at-Large for ON-VERGE, an arts journalism blog sponsored by CUE Art Foundation, until 2013. She hosts her own blog, Contemporaneous Extension, as a compendium of aesthetic interests, archived exhibitions and artists, and uncensored inferences. She has contributed editorially to the College Art Association, the Bushwick Film Festival, Like the Spice Gallery, and the Museum of Modern Art.
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