Breathing New Life into a Molten Core

 

Jimmie Durham, 'The Dangers of Petrification,' 2007 (in the foreground); Candida Höfer, 'Musée du quai Banly Paris l,' 2003; Angentur/Agency, 'Versammlung (Animismus) l Assembly (Animism),' 1992 (photographs courtesy of Generali Foundation, Vienna. Installation view, September 15, 2011-January 29, 2012)

Jimmie Durham, 'The Dangers of Petrification,' 2007 (in the foreground); Candida Höfer, 'Musée du quai Banly Paris l,' 2003; Angentur/Agency, 'Versammlung (Animismus) l Assembly (Animism),' 1992 (photographs courtesy of Generali Foundation, Vienna. Installation view, September 15, 2011-January 29, 2012)

Animism, curated by Anselm Franke

April 26-July 28, 2012

e-flux

311 East Broadway

New York, New York

Animism, by definition the integration of spiritual life into all objects including those without a pulse, is an expansive subject for an art exhibition. The term itself engages the imagination and a dialogue that references the mythological past as well as impending future. The exhibition itself presents historical documents, contemporary work, films, and archival displays to suggest a lofty narrative that bounces between Walt Disney, Marcel Broodthaers, Joachim Koester, Ken Jacobs, Daria Martin, and Vincent Monnikendam, among others. Is an object, a conglomeration of contours and mass, ever truly just an object?

Jimmie Durham, 'The Dangers of Petrification,' 2007 (Image courtesy of Generali Foundation, Vienna. From installation September 15, 2011-January 29, 2012)

Jimmie Durham, 'The Dangers of Petrification,' 2007 (Image courtesy of Generali Foundation, Vienna. From installation September 15, 2011-January 29, 2012)

 

Tun Win Aung and Wah Nu, 'White Piece #0100: Target,' 2011, Acrylic, comic page on canvas, 15.3 x 11.1 Inches

Tun Win Aung and Wah Nu, 'White Piece #0100: Target,' 2011, Acrylic, comic page on canvas, 15.3 x 11.1 Inches

Re-Animators

April 26-June 2, 2012

Meulensteen

511 West 22nd Street

New York, New York.

Meulensteen presents seven artists that rehash the lives of their subject matter and materials. Lions (2010), an animated skit from Oliver Michaels’s series Museum Postcards, imbues a marble lion from the Met’s collection with the power of speech. He discusses the scent of an undisclosed object, noting sewage, bitter almonds, cum, and butter as tasting notes. The stoic lion, seemingly knowledgeable yet impossibly so, is an emblem for the concept of the show: an unlikely art reference bought to life in a new light.

Monique Prieto, 'Repent!, Repent!,'  2008, Oil on canvas, 30 x 96 Inches

Monique Prieto, 'Repent!, Repent!,' 2008, Oil on canvas, 30 x 96 Inches

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About Lynn Maliszewski, Contributor-at-Large

Lynn Maliszewski is a freelance writer based in Brooklyn, New York. She curated and composed work for ArtWrit, BOMB Magazine, HAHA Magazine, Hyperallergic, LatinLover, Modern Painters, No.3, Whitehot Magazine, and Whitewall. She is currently the Contributor-at-Large for ON-VERGE, an arts journalism blog sponsored by CUE Art Foundation, until 2013. She hosts her own blog, Contemporaneous Extension, as a compendium of aesthetic interests, archived exhibitions and artists, and uncensored inferences. She has contributed editorially to the College Art Association, the Bushwick Film Festival, Like the Spice Gallery, and the Museum of Modern Art.
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