Closing Time: Part III

 

Erik Schoonebeek, Untitled (C-44), 2012, gouache and acrylic on book cover, 7.5625" x 4.875" (image courtesy of gallery website)

Erik Schoonebeek, Untitled (C-44), 2012, gouache and acrylic on book cover, 7.5625" x 4.875" (image courtesy of gallery website)

Eric Schoonebeek: Phantom Hand

Jeff Bailey Gallery

Open through July 13

625 West 27th Street

New York, New York

Schoonebeek’s work attains the immediate punch of advertising but intermingles with a mysterious narrative. He uses a variety of surfaces to initiate his compositions, including stained book covers, portfolios, and panels of wood. The nature of his abstraction resembles Tom Nozkowski‘s use of vibrant colors that allude to a patterned matrix. Although Nozkowski’s compositions are much flatter than Schoonebeek’s, they both meld mentions of a natural environment obscured by remnants of recognizable imagery.

Erik Schoonebeek, Untitled (C-39), 2011, gouache and acrylic on book cover, 5.825" x 9.25" (image courtesy of the gallery's website)

Erik Schoonebeek, Untitled (C-39), 2011, gouache and acrylic on book cover, 5.825" x 9.25" (image courtesy of the gallery's website)

 

 

Selma Parlour, Testbed, 2012, Oil on linen, 59.1" x 63" (image courtesy of gallery's website)

Selma Parlour, Testbed, 2012, Oil on linen, 59.1" x 63" (image courtesy of gallery's website)

Selma Parlour and Yelena Popova

Horton Gallery

Open through July 14

504 West 22nd Street

New York, New York

The press release for this two-person exhibition of European talent speaks to the confusion of Modernism. Both artists claim to be adjusting tropes from the past, be it Constructivism or Minimalism. Their thin washes of paint are less aggressive palate-wise. Yelena Popova‘s work plays with the distinction between recognizable shapes and pure abstraction with her lyrical gesture. Swirls and circles resemble graceful bodies, turning of tides, and swelling breezes. Her installation consists of external cardboard shapes that further zoom out the scope of the composition on the wall. Selma Parlour‘s rigid polygons are reminiscent of Albers’ squares, but also summon thoughts of an abstracted still life. They balance the fluidity of Popova yet are stunningly timeless.

Yelena Popova, Untitled, 2012, Oil on linen, 48" x 36.2" (image courtesy of the gallery's website)

Yelena Popova, Untitled, 2012, Oil on linen, 48" x 36.2" (image courtesy of the gallery's website)

 

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About Lynn Maliszewski, Contributor-at-Large

Lynn Maliszewski is a freelance writer based in Brooklyn, New York. She curated and composed work for ArtWrit, BOMB Magazine, HAHA Magazine, Hyperallergic, LatinLover, Modern Painters, No.3, Whitehot Magazine, and Whitewall. She is currently the Contributor-at-Large for ON-VERGE, an arts journalism blog sponsored by CUE Art Foundation, until 2013. She hosts her own blog, Contemporaneous Extension, as a compendium of aesthetic interests, archived exhibitions and artists, and uncensored inferences. She has contributed editorially to the College Art Association, the Bushwick Film Festival, Like the Spice Gallery, and the Museum of Modern Art.
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