ICP Winter 2012

On view January 20, 2012

Weegee, Line-Up for Night Court, ca. 1941. © Weegee/International Center of Photography.

WEEGEE: MURDER IS MY BUSINESS

For an intense decade between 1935 and 1946, Weegee (1899–1968) was one of the most relentlessly inventive figures in American photography. His graphically dramatic and often lurid photographs of New York crimes and news events set the standard for what has become known as tabloid journalism. Freelancing for a variety of New York newspapers and photo agencies, and later working as photo editor for the short-lived liberal daily PM (1940–48), Weegee established a way of combining photographs and texts that was distinctly different from that promoted by other picture magazines, such as LIFE.  Utilizing other distribution venues, Weegee also wrote extensively (including his autobiographical Naked City, published in 1945) and organized his own exhibitions at the Photo League. This exhibition draws upon on the extensive Weegee Archive at ICP and will include environmental recreations of Weegee’s apartment and exhibitions. The exhibition is organized by ICP Chief Curator Brian Wallis.

Anna Shteynshleyger, Covered, 2008. © Anna Shteynshleyger, Collection of Lauren and Mitchell Presser.

PERSPECTIVES 2012

Perspectives is an exhibition series that focuses on emerging young artists working in photography and video. The small group exhibitions in the series are nonthematic, highlighting the individual ideas and achievements of an engaging and eclectic group of new faces. Those presented within Perspectives have not been widely exhibited, inspiring conversations on contemporary art, broadening ICP’s audience, and revealing work that may otherwise not be seen outside of a small gallery setting. Above all, Perspectives will highlight global contemporary artists who have not yet been shown in New York, and who may not conventionally be considered photographers. ICP Curator Christopher Phillips will organize this second exhibition in the series, which will include work by Chien-Chi Chang, Greg Girard, and Anna Shteynshleyger.

Che Guevara, Havana, 1963. © René Burri/Magnum Photos.

MAGNUM CONTACT SHEETS

Magnum Contact Sheets reveals how Magnum photographers have captured and edited their best shots from the 1930s to the present. The contact sheet, a direct print of a roll or sequence of negatives, is the photographer’s first look at what he or she has captured on film, and provides a uniquely intimate glimpse into their working process. It records each step on the route to arriving at an image—providing a rare behind-the-scenes sense of walking alongside the photographer and seeing through their eyes. Including both celebrated icons of photography and lesser-known surprises, the exhibition functions as an “epitaph” to the contact sheet, now rendered obsolete by digital photography. Through these fascinating and usually private images, the exhibition celebrates what and how photographers saw for nearly a century. Coinciding with the publication of Magnum Contact Sheets (Thames & Hudson), edited by ICP Associate Curator Kristen Lubben, the exhibition will include a selection of some of the 139 contact sheets in the book.

April 1965. © Estate of Grey Villet.

THE LOVING STORY: PHOTOGRAPHS BY GREY VILLET


Forty-five years ago, sixteen states still prohibited interracial marriage. Then, in 1967, the U.S. Supreme Court considered the case of Richard Perry Loving, a white man, and his wife, Mildred Loving, a woman of African American and Native American descent, who had been arrested for miscegenation nine years earlier in Virginia. The Lovings were not active in the Civil Rights movement but their tenacious legal battle to justify their marriage changed history when the Supreme Court unanimously declared Virginia’s anti-miscegenation law—and all race-based marriage bans—unconstitutional. LIFE magazine photographer Grey Villet’s intimate images were uncovered by director Nancy Buirski during the making of The Loving Story, an HBO documentary debuting on February 14, 2012. The exhibition, organized by Assistant Curator of Collections Erin Barnett, includes some 20 vintage prints loaned by the estate of Grey Villet and by the Loving family.

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