Reassessments

 

Stacy-Lynn Waddell, Head, 2011. Branded Paper, 12 x 9 inches (image courtesy of Benrimon Contemporary website)

Stacy-Lynn Waddell, Head, 2011. Branded Paper, 12 x 9 inches (image courtesy of Benrimon Contemporary website)

Configured, curated by Teka Selman

March 1-April 14, 2012

Benrimon Contemporary

514 West 24th Street, Floor 2E

New York, New York

The varied artists in Configured include noted skeptics of identity such as LaToya Ruby Frazier, Xaviera Simmons, William Cordova, and Duron Jackson. Fifteen artists provide self-portraits that reverse the mirror they often hold to their subjects. Photography is the predominant medium in the show and captures artists such as Mickalene Thomas and Delphine Diallo in real time. These are reduced, concentrated moments. Some images are a pure embodiment of the artist’s pronounced direction, while others are more concerned with aesthetic consistency. Each artist muses over the realization of self, of identity, regularly. The robust reflections in Configured facilitate a tense moment, embodying the truth of the project while walking the line of fiction in representation.

Mickalene Thomas, Afro Goddess with Hands Between Legs, 2006. Mounted C-print, 48 x 60 inches. (image courtesy of Benrimon Contemporary website)

Mickalene Thomas, Afro Goddess with Hands Between Legs, 2006. Mounted C-print, 48 x 60 inches. (image courtesy of Benrimon Contemporary website)

 

 

 

Kosen (dates unknown). Sake Flask in the Form of an Akita Dog. Porcelain, 1930s. 19.7 x 17.8 x 8.9 cm (7¾ x 7 x 3½ in.). Photograph courtesy of The Levenson Collection.

Kosen (dates unknown). Sake Flask in the Form of an Akita Dog. Porcelain, 1930s. 19.7 x 17.8 x 8.9 cm (7¾ x 7 x 3½ in.). Photograph courtesy of The Levenson Collection.

Deco Japan: Shaping Art and Culture, 1920-1945

March 16-June 10, 2012

Japan Society

393 East 47th Street

New York, New York

The Art Deco movement often summons thoughts of Eastern and Central Europe immediately despite evolving at several locations around the world. The distinct strand of Japanese Art Deco flourished out of the cultural tension and military presence of the first half of the 20th century. The exhibition at the Japan Society covers a wide spectrum of materials, ranging from ceramics and photography to sheet music, match boxes, and posters. The development of moga, an anonymous, independent woman that is both chic and modern, signals transformed expectations in Japan. This exhibition also provides insight into the burgeoning international dialogue, where European trends such as small animal bronzes begin to make an appearance with a uniquely Asian spin. The span of entries at the Japan Society allows for a seamless insight into history, design, and lifestyle.

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About Lynn Maliszewski, Contributor-at-Large

Lynn Maliszewski is a freelance writer based in Brooklyn, New York. She curated and composed work for ArtWrit, BOMB Magazine, HAHA Magazine, Hyperallergic, LatinLover, Modern Painters, No.3, Whitehot Magazine, and Whitewall. She is currently the Contributor-at-Large for ON-VERGE, an arts journalism blog sponsored by CUE Art Foundation, until 2013. She hosts her own blog, Contemporaneous Extension, as a compendium of aesthetic interests, archived exhibitions and artists, and uncensored inferences. She has contributed editorially to the College Art Association, the Bushwick Film Festival, Like the Spice Gallery, and the Museum of Modern Art.
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