Teaching an Old Dog New Tricks

 

 

Ya-Ting Kao, Target No. 1, 2011 oil & acrylic on canvas, 13 x 16 inches. (image courtesy of Rooster Gallery's online catalogue)

Ya-Ting Kao, Target No. 1, 2011 oil & acrylic on canvas, 13 x 16 inches. (image courtesy of Rooster Gallery's online catalogue)

Borderless Map: Taiwanese Painting Now, Curated by NuNu Hung

March 9-April 15, 2012

Rooster Gallery

190 Orchard Street

New York, New York

The art world has been notably enamored with Chinese artists for nearly a quarter of a century, inspiring the much-deserved credit to artists that had been pigeonholed and undervalued. Taiwan is indeed ruled by the Republic of China, an opposing force to the People’s Republic of China known as mainland China. The artists in Borderless Map are products of the 70s and 80s, when censorship had been eased and the government moved toward democracy. Technological innovation led to a fruitful economy. A dialogue with the world blossomed and a younger generation of artists came to focus on their introspective contributions to the “virtual society” rather than grandiose political statements. Although the state remains constrained by diplomatic inequality and civil baggage, Rooster Gallery provides insights into a culture developing its own unique artistic production through a complicated mental landscape.

Jean Hua-Chen Huang, 1981, 2010 oil on canvas, 12  x  24  inches. (image courtesy of Rooster Gallery's free catalogue)

Jean Hua-Chen Huang, 1981, 2010 oil on canvas, 12 x 24 inches. (image courtesy of Rooster Gallery's free catalogue)

 

 

 

David Lynch, title unknown (image courtesy of Tilton Gallery website)

David Lynch, title unknown (image courtesy of Tilton Gallery website)

David Lynch

March 6-April 14, 2012

Tilton Gallery

8 East 76th Street

New York, New York

In David Lynch’s first solo show in New York since 1989, one can taste his audacious reflections of human nature. Slight yet explicit details underscore the awkwardness of human interaction that can be commonly referred to as Lynchian. He presents paintings, sculpture, works on paper, photography, and even a forty-two second film. Like his films, there is an intentional ambiguity pertaining to location and history of his subjects. His momentary realities are potent, prickly morsels of a grotesque reality that is as bizarre as it is relatable.

David Lynch, title unknown (image courtesy of Tilton Gallery website)

David Lynch, title unknown (image courtesy of Tilton Gallery website)

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About Lynn Maliszewski, Contributor-at-Large

Lynn Maliszewski is a freelance writer based in Brooklyn, New York. She curated and composed work for ArtWrit, BOMB Magazine, HAHA Magazine, Hyperallergic, LatinLover, Modern Painters, No.3, Whitehot Magazine, and Whitewall. She is currently the Contributor-at-Large for ON-VERGE, an arts journalism blog sponsored by CUE Art Foundation, until 2013. She hosts her own blog, Contemporaneous Extension, as a compendium of aesthetic interests, archived exhibitions and artists, and uncensored inferences. She has contributed editorially to the College Art Association, the Bushwick Film Festival, Like the Spice Gallery, and the Museum of Modern Art.
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