The Interaction between Past and Future

 

Rahi Revzani, image courtesy of the artist's website

Rahi Revzani, image courtesy of the artist's website

Rahi Rezvani: Unseen

March 1-March 30, 2012

United Photo Industries

111 Front Street, Suite 204

Brooklyn, New York

Rahi Rezvani’s photographssummon the fantasies of Man Ray and Miroslav Tichy in their physical volume and unpredictable angles. The portraits illustrate a dark mystery beyond the single sitting.

Rahi Revzani, image courtesy of the artist's website

Rahi Revzani, image courtesy of the artist's website

Each image is heightened by minute detail, texture, and grain. These are not neutral images depicting a spritely audacity or commemorating a pretty face. Rezvani’s portraits imply an anxiety, a nervous energy, that all feel at their worst. These gritty images are arresting, imaginative narratives that remain within the frame.

Rahi Revzani, image courtesy of artist's website

Rahi Revzani, image courtesy of artist's website

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Krypta installation view

Krypta installation view

DRAOK: Krypta, curated by Paola Gallio

February 26-March 30, 2012

Soloway

348 South 4th Street

Brooklyn, New York

DRAOK is a collaborative group formed by Giorgio Guidi and Marta Pierobon in 2010 that indulges in “architecture, perception, and social systems.” Their recent showing at Soloway, the second part of an exchange program with Spazio Morris in Milan, illustrates the concealed past continually built-over in Italy. An iron and clay figure entitled Who painted the roses red???has deep impressions of fingers and blades, interspersed with cracks and crude animal forms.

DRAOK, Who painted the roses red???, 2012, wood, iron, unfired clay, resin, spray paint and roses, 150x60x60cm.

DRAOK, Who painted the roses red???, 2012, wood, iron, unfired clay, resin, spray paint and roses, 150x60x60cm.

Propped atop a wooden box surrounded by cloth roses, it addresses the totems of Catholicism that fluctuate between primal desires and tradition. A towering plaster column, finely detailed with spiritual symbols, and a c-print on the gallery’s far wall, layered with religious imagery, are also included in the showing. DRAOK intersperses the past with modern technologies to reveal the discrepancies between transcending and forgetting the past.

DRAOK, Column, 2012,  plaster, fabrics. 3mx40cm

DRAOK, Column, 2012, plaster, fabrics. 3mx40cm

 

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About Lynn Maliszewski, Contributor-at-Large

Lynn Maliszewski is a freelance writer based in Brooklyn, New York. She curated and composed work for ArtWrit, BOMB Magazine, HAHA Magazine, Hyperallergic, LatinLover, Modern Painters, No.3, Whitehot Magazine, and Whitewall. She is currently the Contributor-at-Large for ON-VERGE, an arts journalism blog sponsored by CUE Art Foundation, until 2013. She hosts her own blog, Contemporaneous Extension, as a compendium of aesthetic interests, archived exhibitions and artists, and uncensored inferences. She has contributed editorially to the College Art Association, the Bushwick Film Festival, Like the Spice Gallery, and the Museum of Modern Art.
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