Three for One – FB Gallery

Bruce Brosnan, Rolling Thunder, 2010; acrylic paint on MDF; 53.75 x 43”

Bruce Brosnan, Rolling Thunder, 2010; acrylic paint on MDF; 53.75 x 43”

Feature Inc.

131 Allen St

All exhibitions February 15 – March 18

Bruce Brosnan: See, hear, remember

Brosnan creates exuberant MDF (medium-density fiberboard) cutouts painted with acrylic graphics. Conflict arises between the luscious shapes rendered in colors so bright they burn the retina. The shapes acquire a strength that has them battling one another, where all the shapes merge toward one focal point. These works reside between playful childhood graphic and crafted adulthood, where a cloud can strangle a starburst in technicolor.

 

Tyler Vlahovich, Untitled, 2011; oil paint on canvas; 54.25 x 42.5”

Tyler Vlahovich, Untitled, 2011; oil paint on canvas; 54.25 x 42.5”

Tyler Vlahovich: recent work

There is a mysticism in Vlahovich’s work that immediately summons thoughts of micrographs, and what one might have thought of when the first image created with a microscope appeared. His images teeter between abstraction and landscape, giving the viewer a sense of depth obscured by pure fear or ecstasy. October (2011) conjures thoughts of a crinkling leaf, pleasant autumn sunset, and, oddly enough, Goya’s The Third of May (1808). His compositions are effortlessly engrossing in their dictation of ambiguity.

Tyler Vlahovich, October, 2011; oil paint on canvas; 41.25 x 55"

Tyler Vlahovich, October, 2011; oil paint on canvas; 41.25 x 55"

 

Todd Knopke, The Door, 2012; fabric, thread, webbing, metal grommets, metal button, metal zipper, tassel, rubber shoe insert, 108 x 96 x 3”;

Todd Knopke, The Door, 2012; fabric, thread, webbing, metal grommets, metal button, metal zipper, tassel, rubber shoe insert, 108 x 96 x 3”;

Todd Knopke: Upfront

The tremendous, hanging collages by Todd Knopke surge with material like thread, webbing, metal, and even rubber shoe inserts. They are impeccably sewn with each pattern or material distinctly in place. Despite the immediate chaos, the backdrop hosts a simpler scene in the foreground. Knopke reminds the viewer that the grand scheme of what we see is an elaborate collage, eternally complicated although it doesn’t necessarily require simplification.

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About Lynn Maliszewski, Contributor-at-Large

Lynn Maliszewski is a freelance writer based in Brooklyn, New York. She curated and composed work for ArtWrit, BOMB Magazine, HAHA Magazine, Hyperallergic, LatinLover, Modern Painters, No.3, Whitehot Magazine, and Whitewall. She is currently the Contributor-at-Large for ON-VERGE, an arts journalism blog sponsored by CUE Art Foundation, until 2013. She hosts her own blog, Contemporaneous Extension, as a compendium of aesthetic interests, archived exhibitions and artists, and uncensored inferences. She has contributed editorially to the College Art Association, the Bushwick Film Festival, Like the Spice Gallery, and the Museum of Modern Art.
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