Tag Archives: 1970′s

The World Is Super Flat: Ultimate Art (Part 3 of 3)–C’est fin! Yay!

Suiko, Eternity, Hiroshima (April 2007) Spray paint on wall.

The postwar (World War II) state of affairs of Japan dramatically paralleled the social postwar struggle during the Edo period; yet quite opposite of Edo-period concerns with national isolation, postwar Japan reflected upon globalization’s effect on Japanese identity. Due to the interrelations between nations, Japan’s feudal divisions between rural and urban areas weakened by closing the gap between incomes due to the American occupancy during the 1940s. Moreover, by the … Continue reading »

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The World Is Super Flat: Ultimate Art (Part 2 of 3)

Figure A: Ippitsussai Bunchô, Lovers Spied upon by a Little Boy, Yoshiwara, (c. 1770-80) Color woodcut

The ukiyo-e—translate to “pictures of the floating world” and are woodblock prints—exemplify an infamous Edo-period subversive art form due to their strong association to ukiyo, “floating world,” subject matter and premodern city life. Ippitsussai Bunchô’s (unsigned, due to the erotic subject matter, but attributed to Bunchô) colored woodcut entitled Lovers Spied upon by a Little Boy, circa 1770-80 portrays a highly-contrived, erotic scene delineating an intimate encounter between a girl … Continue reading »

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