Tag Archives: Mira Dayal

Studio Visit with Lizzy DeVita

Lizzy De Vita, "You’re Gonna Break My Heart Again" (2015). Courtesy of the artist.

by Mira Dayal

Lizzy De Vita, “You’re Gonna Break My Heart Again” (2015). Courtesy of the artist.

From the concrete stairwell, we watch foam bubbles of saliva trickle out of the woman’s lips, imperceptibly trembling around the slick edge of a plastic mouthpiece. She is still. Thin plastic wires center her and constrain her movements. Look around and watch the two other women blink slowly, breathe heavily, as they are … Continue reading »

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Koosil-ja at The Kitchen

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by Mira Dayal

“Capitalism” connotes an all-consuming practice of labor, a collapse of leisure into labor, a tireless machine… what can dance offer in translation? Koosil-ja’s “I Am Capitalism” suggests an answer: exhaustion, and a possible collapse of the machine. On stage, she gives us inward pointing feet, shaking knees, endlessly tracking eyes, and visceral collapse. She borrows from and imperfectly mimes the dances of masters before her–in an assemblage … Continue reading »

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Concerning Sexual Performance

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by Mira Dayal

“Charge is a performance exploring the hyper-personal and sensorial connective tissue of human relationships, and the blurring of the senses by means of technology.” So begins the outline for Glasser’s performance at The Kitchen. The stage is set with two tall screens symmetrically placed at the corners of the floor facing the audience and a much larger, rectangular screen along the far wall. In the middle of … Continue reading »

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Studio Visits: A Critical Aspect of Contemporary Art Practice

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By Mira Dayal The artist’s studio is often conceived of as a private space, a room for thought and exploration in which the artist can sustain direct engagement with their art. It is not usually conceived of as a public space open to visitors and conversation. Yet many artists working today see studio visits as critical to their professional and aesthetic development. Depending on the visitor, a studio visit could… Continue reading »
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Post-Internet Windows

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by Mira Dayal

“It started when I woke up on a Sunday morning to this image of a stuffed, fake leather recliner chair from Macy’s facing me on my pillow, where it had fallen out of the Times magazine the night before. I was horrified because I hate the image and what it represents, and I thought, ‘How did this get into my most intimate space?’” So artist Joan Snitzer … Continue reading »

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Cyclical Production: A Studio Visit with Joan Easton

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by Mira Dayal

What comes first in a work of art– the idea or the physical object? What if the physical object is never produced, or if it is produced without a target idea? This question forms the basis of thought in much of intellectual property law, art historical analysis, and curatorial proposals. For artist Joan Easton, this apparent dichotomy is a productive root of practice. What does Easton produce?… Continue reading »
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Barbara Siegel and The Birth of New Authors

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by Mira Dayal

The death of the author has traditionally been placed in a trajectory towards the birth of the spectator, and then towards the life of experience. For Barbara Siegel, the trajectory has led elsewhere: towards the births of new authors in workers who “produce” the pieces in tandem with the artist. The resulting works are not collaborative in the traditional sense, where it is implied that two or … Continue reading »

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